Blog, Press Show Picks

Oliver Bonas autumn and winter range 2019

This week Oliver Bonas showed both their new interior and clothing ranges for this autumn and winter to the press and influencers.

This is a company that goes from strength to strength in both their home-ware and fashion collections. They know the look their core customer wants, that being a mixture of sophisticated, modern with some humour thrown into the mix.

There are two main themes running through both the home and fashion collections. The main theme is Enlightenment and Orient Express is the capsule collection. This could also be described as Art Deco or Luxe.

There is a great deal of glass , mirrors and glamour. Oliver Bonas produce cocktail ware, including drinks trolley’s which, a little bird tells me, always sell out. Talking of cocktails there are drink mixing kits, and gorgeous glasses, lovely mirrors, rattan furniture, picture frames and planters.

Velvet chairs and fringing on lamp shades carry on from this season but with new twists of colour, shapes and length of fringing. 

Part of Enlightenment is Sanctuary. This includes mosaic, ironwork ,ceramics and plants, and baskets. Oliver Bonas now sell real and faux plants in their larger stores.

There is a vast array of baskets, pouffés, throws and cushions. The pouffe’s are particularly original.

Another best selling line for Oliver Bonas are items decorated with letters of the alphabet, and also the letters themselves.

Always great with decorative patterns, from August the company will be selling some very nice bags and cushions with lovely surface designs.

New this season, are Oliver Bonas own brand of decorative filament light bulb.

Last of all I must mention the very the simple ,but lovely art works in the form of textural wall hangings and bright prints.

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Breathing Colour by Hella Jongerius

 

A series of newly commissioned installations, exploring our perceptions and connections to colour. Research, art and design combine in works that challenge the modern industrialization of colour.

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Drawing on 15 years of research, acclaimed designer Hella Jongerius presents Breathing Colour: an installation-based exhibition that takes a deeper look at how colour behaves.

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Jonerius’ research has been inspired by a wide range of sources. These include painters, who recognized and recorded how light affects objects. For example Monet who painted the same haystack over and over to document the different colours and atmospheres at different times of day.

Breathing Colour creates an exhibition that blurs the boundaries between art and design. Combining intriguing shapes with extensive research: the exhibition questions our preconceptions of colour and embraces its imperfections and experimentation.

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Hella Jongerius explains:

‘There is a phenomenon  in colorimetry called Metamerism. This was the starting point of my colour research. It occurs when colours are viewed in different conditions, and describes the effect when two colours appear to match even though they might not actually do. I think everyone once bought a piece of furniture or clothingin a certain colour, and experienced a shock when unpacking it back at home. Most companies see the effect as problematic and try to avoid it, and produce colours that attempt to eliminate it. But I want to make a plea for embracing metamerism. As a designer, I want to make a plea for plastics, varnishes and paints to use layered pigments that provide intense colours that are allowed to breathe with changing light.’IMG_1341.jpg

The exhibition is divided into separate spaces that simulate daylight conditions at specific times of day-morning-noon and evening. These three phases explore the impact of changing daylight on our perception of colour. Each installation includes a series of 3D objects as well as textiles. Some of which are hand-woven while others are produced on industrial looms.

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Large –scale textiles experiment in creating black tones without the use of black materials. Woven from woolen, linen and cotton threads, these textiles are an extension of Jongerius’ previous research into the colour

Black and her rejection of the standard industrial approach, to adding carbon to colours in order to darken them.IMG_1377.jpg

Where colours were once produced by mixing pigments into infinite permutations, we now select them according to a name on a chart.

Jongerius argues that these processes of industrialization have narrowed our experience of colour and its cultural meanings. Breathing Colour explores how we relate to colour in a more intimate and personal way.

At The Design Museum 224-238 Kensington High Street London W8 6AG

28th June – 24th September 2017

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book review

House of Cards

Beautiful greetings cards to make from expert card designers, by ‘Just a Card’ campaign founder Sarah Hamilton

9781910904572

This excellent book celebrates the very best in contemporary greeting card design. The ten makers featured talk about their work practice, show their studios and also present a project for the reader to make.

Having said that, the book is not prescriptive but instead encourages the reader to use their own imagination to create cards using the techniques  shown.

The book opens with a chapter on the history of the greeting card and how charity cards came into being. The author then discusses where to find inspiration.

There is a chapter on selling cards including very practical tips, such as the most economic size to make them, choosing envelopes to enhance the card and putting your details on the back of the card.

Most informative and very useful is the chapter written by Jehane Boden Spiers, who as well as being an artist in her own write also runs a company representing artists to publishers. Her company is called ‘Yellow House Art Licensing’ and she has some very good artist /designers on her books. By licensing work if it is successful it can generate a very good income stream for the artist.

The techniques covered include letterpress printing, silkscreen printing, decoupage, lino cut printing, paper cutting and textile foiling.HouseofCards_HR_RGB (#31ECC

Sarah’s own work is inspired by colour, nature, and mid century design. She started her own working life designing cards for Paperchase, The Conran Shop, and Habitat.

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This is a book well worth adding to your craft library and is excellent value.

Published by Pavilion £14.99

www.pavillionbooks.com

www.justacard.org

www.yellowhouseartlicensing.com

 

 

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Create your own feather sun prints

To make a sun print you need some sunlight and the technique is easier to do in spring and summer than in the winter. However even on an overcast day you can get good results if you are patient. The Sunprint paper goes through a chemical change when it is exposed to sunlight and even as it is drying the areas that have been exposed to the sunlight will carry on changing in depth of colour. Once cut up and mounted they look fabulous in any interior and would make a great present too.

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You will need

Feathers

Sun print kit from Fred Aldous, including sheets of sun-print paper and acrylic sheet

Piece of cardboard

An A4 shallow container filled with water

Cutting mat

Steel Rule

Craft Knife

Pencil

Picture Frames

TIP : Make sure to peel off any backing paper from the acrylic before starting.

Instructions

  1. Go outside, and find a sunny spot. Take a piece of Sunprint paper and place it blue side up on top of the cardboard. Arrange the feathers on top of the blue paper and place the acrylic sheet on top of all of it. Try and comb out the feather so it looks wispy and feather like.
  2. Expose to the sun until the paper turns almost white from 1-5minutes depending on the sunlight. Do not leave too long as it will over expose. Remove the acrylic sheet and the feathers.
  1. Rinse the paper for about a minute and then leave sun prints to dry, before cutting out and fitting into the frame.

You can buy your sun paper from http://www.fredaldous.co.uk

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Credits –

Sun print paper – Fred Aldous (http://www.fredaldous.co.uk)

Vase – Habitat (http://www.habitat.co.uk)

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