Features, Uncategorized

The Colourist

The art of colourful living  by Annie Sloan

Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 17.14.02

The Colourist is a Bookazine and is Annie Sloan‘s latest venture. The current plan is to publish bi-yearly, but don’t quote me on that.

shibori

 

For those who don’t know, a bookazine, as it says on the tin, is a cross between a book and a magazine. It looks magazine like, but is printed  on much better paper. At £9.95 it is twice the price of a magazine, but it is a periodical that you will want to keep, as you would a book.

I did wonder if The Colourist would just be a vehicle for Annie to sell more of her excellent chalk paint. The paint does feature, but in such an inspirational and interesting way it doesn’t feel like an advertorial.

After an introduction by Annie, where she  espouses her love of colour, the Bookazine is divided into sections starting with  The colour hunter. This  includes, What is new, Annie’s picks, Designer Focus, Trend watch and a competition.

There are  inspirational features on designers both  current and historic such as Cressida Bell and Joseph Frank

 

Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 17.14.33

Homes collections include Charleston Farmhouse and new modern designers such as Lucy Tiffney and Tamsyn Morgans and Dutch artist Yvon van Bergen.

dutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are  travel features and most importantly Annie’s work with Oxfam in Ethiopia.

pink

There are quite a few How To’s and Make Over’s and a lovely give away,  a  free style stencil accompanied by step by step photographs showing how to use the stencil, to create a tile table top.

Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 17.15.09

Before I finish this review I think it is important to mention Felix Sloan who is the creative director of The Colourist and Jane Toft, the Managing Editor. Jane is very imaginative and so in touch with the zeitgeist, it was she who started Mollie Makes and The Simple Things. Their combined hard work and design flair has created something truly desirable.

cressida

Perhaps Annie should have the final word.

“It all boils down to sharing my passion for style and colour. I want to inspire everyone to get creative!”

BlogFooterOrange

Uncategorized

Breathing Colour by Hella Jongerius

 

A series of newly commissioned installations, exploring our perceptions and connections to colour. Research, art and design combine in works that challenge the modern industrialization of colour.

IMG_1372.jpg

Drawing on 15 years of research, acclaimed designer Hella Jongerius presents Breathing Colour: an installation-based exhibition that takes a deeper look at how colour behaves.

IMG_1308.jpg

Jonerius’ research has been inspired by a wide range of sources. These include painters, who recognized and recorded how light affects objects. For example Monet who painted the same haystack over and over to document the different colours and atmospheres at different times of day.

Breathing Colour creates an exhibition that blurs the boundaries between art and design. Combining intriguing shapes with extensive research: the exhibition questions our preconceptions of colour and embraces its imperfections and experimentation.

IMG_1323.jpg

Hella Jongerius explains:

‘There is a phenomenon  in colorimetry called Metamerism. This was the starting point of my colour research. It occurs when colours are viewed in different conditions, and describes the effect when two colours appear to match even though they might not actually do. I think everyone once bought a piece of furniture or clothingin a certain colour, and experienced a shock when unpacking it back at home. Most companies see the effect as problematic and try to avoid it, and produce colours that attempt to eliminate it. But I want to make a plea for embracing metamerism. As a designer, I want to make a plea for plastics, varnishes and paints to use layered pigments that provide intense colours that are allowed to breathe with changing light.’IMG_1341.jpg

The exhibition is divided into separate spaces that simulate daylight conditions at specific times of day-morning-noon and evening. These three phases explore the impact of changing daylight on our perception of colour. Each installation includes a series of 3D objects as well as textiles. Some of which are hand-woven while others are produced on industrial looms.

IMG_1366.jpg

Large –scale textiles experiment in creating black tones without the use of black materials. Woven from woolen, linen and cotton threads, these textiles are an extension of Jongerius’ previous research into the colour

Black and her rejection of the standard industrial approach, to adding carbon to colours in order to darken them.IMG_1377.jpg

Where colours were once produced by mixing pigments into infinite permutations, we now select them according to a name on a chart.

Jongerius argues that these processes of industrialization have narrowed our experience of colour and its cultural meanings. Breathing Colour explores how we relate to colour in a more intimate and personal way.

At The Design Museum 224-238 Kensington High Street London W8 6AG

28th June – 24th September 2017

IMG_1398.jpg

BlogFooterOrange

 

Uncategorized

Sew your own African print cushions

IMG_0002_3.jpg

A quick and inexpensive project to make in an afternoon or less.

I love these wild African designs and wanted to make some cushions from them. In the past it was impossible to purchase African Wax fabric other than by the six yard roll. Luckily for us we can now purchase on line through Etsy and also through the web site below.

http://www.africanfabric.co.uk/

They sell 100% cotton wax prints most of which are made in Ghana.

Surprisingly these vibrant prints did not originate in Africa but in Holland. Now for a bit of History from The Philadelphia Museum of Art

http://www.philamuseum.org/

The designs originated in the Dutch city of Helmond, where, in 1846, industrialist Pieter Fentener van Vlissingen purchased a textile factory with the goal of selling upholstery fabric, bedspreads, and handkerchiefs abroad. Van Vlissingen began creating imitation batik fabric based on designs from Indonesia — then known as the Dutch East Indies — with the goal of capitalizing on new roller printing technology that could effect the look of batik without all the labor-intensive work required to make the real thing.

So now you know the history now here is a super quick and easy way to make a cushion using it.

Rather than inserting a zip you use two pieces of fabric to make the back of the cushion. The two pieces overlap in the centre back so that the cushion pad is hidden.

 

IMG_0003_3.jpg

You will need

A cushion pad

For the cushion front 1 piece of fabric, the same size as the cushion pad.

For the cushion back 2 pieces of fabric each the same width as the cushion front x ¾ of the length.

Scissors

Sewing Machine

Cotton Thread

Pins

Instructions

Step1

Pin and machine stitch a hem 1cm along the side of each piece of fabric that will eventually be overlapping.

Step2

Tack the two back pieces together, overlapping the hemmed edge. Once tacked together they should measure the same in both length and depth as the fabric that has been cut out for the front.

Step3

With right sides facing, pin the front and back together. Pin, then machine sew down the four sides. Remove the pins and insert the cushion pad.

IMG_0006_2

Credits –

Rug  – Flair Rugs (http://flairrugs.com/)

Thread – Korbond (http://www.korbond.co.uk/)

BlogFooterTurqiose