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Fringe Lampshade

 Fringed Lamp Shade

Hessian, Fringing and all things textural are still going strong as an interior trend. So I thought I’d buy some fringing and upcycle an old lampshade. I am very pleased with the result.

You will need

Lamp Shade

Glue gun and glue sticks

Scissors

Roll of Hessian Fringing

1.Wrap the fringed hessian round the base of the shade and add an extra centimeter and then cut.

2. Stick the first band of fringing to the bottom of the lamp so the edge of the fringe is parallel to the edge of the lamp.

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 sticking the fringing so it just touches the row below.  Do this until the lamp is covered in fringing.

4. Pull away the cord that holds the fringing together on all the rows and then put it on the lamp base.

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Make your own bathroom shelves using Rust-Oluem paints!

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You will need –

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  1. Ensure the surfaces to be painted are clean, dry and free from grease and contaminants.
  2. Using pliers, remove staples from the outer edges of the boxes.Colour_wash-how_to-2-800x800-1
  3. Give each wine crate a light coat of Rust-Oleum Colour Wash (we used Cloud Blue and Mint Sorbet) and leave this to dry.Colour_wash-how_to-3-800x800-1
  4. Screw the boxes together, alternating colours.Colour_wash-how_to-4-800x800-1

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Mid Century Cushions

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Make stylish cushions from original 1960’s fabric

You can still purchase pieces of sixties fabric on eBay and very occasionally find them in vintage shops and markets. These cushions were made from one piece of fabric that had four asymmetric circles on it. I decided to cut the fabric into four to make four cushion fronts and make the back of the cushions from plain linen.

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You will need

60’s Fabric for the cushion front

Plain cotton or linen for the cushion back you will need two thirds more than for the front.

Scissors

Tape measure

Needle
Thread

Dressmakers pins

Cushion pad

Interfacing (optional)

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Instructions

  1. Cut your fabric into squares so they are the same dimension as the cushion pad 
plus 2cm seam allowance. If the fabric is flimsy or damaged, back it with 
interfacing.
  2. From the fabric for the cushion back, measure and cut out two pieces, each the 
same width as the fabric front but 2/3rds the length.
  3. Neaten along one width seam of each cushion back by turning under by 5mm 
and under again by the same amount. Sew with a running stitch.
  4. With right sides facing, and overlapping the neatened edges of the cushion 
backs at the centre back, pin the cushion front to the cushion back round the 
edge of the square.
  5. With a running stitch, sew the front to the back of the cushion. Turn the cushion 
through the gap and insert the cushion pad.

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Make your own butterfly chair cover

Butterfly chairs are currently in vogue again. I saw lots of them at Maison et Objects in Paris. They were covered in a variety of fabrics and skins including leather and pony skin.

I bought this old butterfly chair in a junk shop for £10. The cover was rust stained and not very nice so I decided to give it a revamp.

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You will need

3 metres of white cotton drill

Dylon goldfish orange machine dye

Dylon Tulip Red machine dye

Dress making scissors

Sewing machine

Thread

Pen

15mm bias binding

 

Instructions

 

  1. Cut the fabric in half and using the instructions on the pot, dye half the fabric red and half orange.
  2. Draw round the old cover to make a pattern and don’t forget to add the seam allowance
  3. Cut out the pieces and sew the pieces first in one colour and then in the next together as in the original pattern.
  4. The only difficult part is pinning and stretching the seat top to the seat bottom as you are joining a concave piece of fabric to a convex piece. With right sides facing, pin the top of the seat to the bottom at the center seam. Sew from the center of the seat outwards stretching as you sew. This way the two pieces will fit together. Repeat this step to join the other half of the chair top to the chair bottom.
  5. The pockets for the front and back of the seam are neatened at their bases and then sewn with raw edges onto the cover. This is repeated for the reverse of the seat.
  6. Once the pockets are in place, with wrong sides facing, sew the seat top to the seat bottom round the edge and then hide all the raw edges with bias binding.

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Dye your own shibori chair

2C2A2810 copy.jpgRecycling week starts today so am posting some classy recycling projects on my blog this week. When I spotted this down at heel cocktail chair in a charity shop, I knew I was  onto a winner.

I made a pattern and then created my own shibori print just by pleating and using clothes pegs. The hook and loop tape opening on the side seam makes fitting easy.

Tip: Before doing anything with the fabric, wash on a hot wash and then tumble dry it on a hot setting. This way it will shrink as much as it is ever going to. Iron so you have flat fabric to work with.

chair

You will need:

6m of medium weight Calico

Pins, needles and thread

Safety pins

Cotton tape

Water-soluble pen

Dylon Ocean blue hand dye

Salt

Clothes pegs

Sewing machine

Hook and loop tape

 

1.To make the pattern for each section of the chair cut out a piece of calico, cut them large so there’s enough spare fabric for fitting, the lower edge of the chair will need more than you think necessary to allow for making a tape casing, so be generous. Pin each section onto the chair and then add seam allowance. Remove the section and cut out. Sew the calico cover together, leave one of the side seams half open. Fit the cover onto the chair, pin the side seam closed and adjust the fitting, taking it in to give a closer fit.

2. Remove the calico cover from the chair, mark the sewn seams with felt pen as well as the centre line of each panel.

3.Unpick the calico cover, your pattern, and pin onto more calico to make the chair fabric. Cut out the fabric, into as many pattern pieces as you need, I had 6, and press.4 Pin pattern onto washed and ironed fabric.jpg

4.Concertina each pattern piece of calico into pleats.

5 Concrtina each pattern piece into pleats

5. Press flat with a steam iron.

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6.Peg the pleated pieces at even intervals.

7 Peg each pattern pieceat regular intervals.jpg

7. Wet the pegged fabrics. Mix the  Dylon hand dye according to the manufacturers instructions and then put in the pegged fabric pieces. Follow the instructions on the dye packet.

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8. Once the dye has taken, remove the pegs and open up the fabric and put the pieces under running water until the water runs clear.

9 remove pegs and rinse the pieces until the water runs clear..jpg

9. Wash and dry the pieces

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10.Sew the pieces together as you did for the original calico pattern leaving one of the side seams half open.

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11. Try the cover on the chair inside out and pin any adjustments that need to be made. Remove the cover and make the adjustments on the sewing machine.

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12. Cut a 3cm bias strip from calico to bind the curved raw edges around the chair legs. Pin, and sew, turn the raw edge under by 0.5cm then turn the binding and sew in place. Sew hook and loop tape to both sides of the seam opening.

13. To make the tape casing, turn lower edges of the chair cover in by 4cm, turn in the raw edge by 1cm then sew down close to the edge. Measure up for the tape, thread through the casings with a safety pin.

 

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Make lovely lavender bags using Laura Ashley Fabric

After being inspired by the new Laura Ashley collection I designed some lavender bags using the lovely new fabrics. They have a loop on the top so you can hang them over a coat hanger or you can just slide them between layers of clothes. They have an envelope back so you can replace the lavender sachet when it gets stale.

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You will need

For the front 1 piece of fabric 15cm x 15cm

For the back 2 pieces of fabric 15cm x 11cm

For the tab 1 piece of fabric 14cm x 3cm

2 pieces of muslin 14cm x 14cm

Dress-makers pins

Scissors

Sewing machine and thread

Tracing or greaseproof paper pencil and ruler to make a pattern

Steam Iron

Dry Lavender

Sewing Needle

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Instructions

1.Make a pattern on tracing or grease-proof paper. Place it over an interesting part of the fabric choosing the part of the pattern you like. Pin in place and then cut one front piece, two back pieces and one tab piece.

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2.Neaten one 15cm edge on both back pieces, turn over 0.5cm and 0.5cm again and press. Pin and sew with a running stitch.

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3. Make the tab by turning the long sides in by 0.5cm on both sides. Press flat and fold in half so all the raw edges are caught inside. Pin and sew with a running stitch.

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4. Fold the tab in half lengthways. With right side facing out, pin the loop facing downwards on the top edge of the front fabric square. Sew in place with a running stitch.

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5. With right sides facing and neatened edge towards the middle, pin one of the back pieces to the front piece, covering the loop just made. Sew with a running stitch.

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6. With right sides facing, pin the second back piece with its neatened edge in the centre, so that it overlaps the top piece in the middle, to the lower half of the front piece. Sew with a running stitch

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7. With right sides facing, pin the second back piece with its neatened edge in the centre, so that it overlaps the top piece in the middle, to the lower half of the front piece. Sew with a running stitch.

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8. Cut two pieces of muslin. Sew three and half sides with a running stitch.

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9. Fill the Muslin with lavender. Close the opening with a hemming stitch. Insert the muslin bag into the outer bag.

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Create your own pillow cases using liberty fabric

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Liberty lawn is soft beautiful fabric, perfect for a place to lay your head. I have chosen very pretty liberty prints from Sew Box an on line fabric supplier. I bought white and light coloured cotton lace from http://www.craftysewer.com I dyed the lace using http://www.dylon.co.uk hand dyes. However if you don’t want to do this, http://www.craftyribbons.com

have Etienne a French cotton deep coloured cotton lace.

You will need

Liberty lawn from http://www.sewbox.co.uk/

I used

LTL03634042A  Danjo

LTL03632019J Betsy Pink

LTL03633037A Margaret Annie

A pillow -case from which to copy the measurements

Lace

Sewing thread

Tape measure

Dress making pins

Instructions

  1. Measure the pillow-case add 1cm seam allowance to each side.
  2. Measure the depth of the flap and add seam allowance to each side.
  3. Cut a front and a back in one fabric and cut a flap in a contrast fabric.
  4. Neaten one long side of the flap by turning under 0.5cm and the same again, sew with a running stitch.
  5. Sew one piece of trim along the neatened edge of the flap. With right sides together, sew the flap onto one narrow side of the back piece of fabric. Press the seam flat.
  6. Turn under and under again one narrow side of the, pillowcase, front fabric. Press, pin and sew on a piece of lace.
  7. With right sides facing, pin the pillow case front to the pillowcase back so that the front opening reaches up to where the flap is. Sew with a running stitch.
  8. Fold the flap over, where you have just sewn so that the front of the flap faces the wrong side of the pillow front. Pin the sides of the flap to the sides of the pillow and sew with a running stitch. Turn through so that the fabric is the correct way round.

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