Blog, book review, Book Reviews

Bohemian Style at Home by Kate Young

published by Thames and Hudson at £14.95

Bohemian style is characterized by free-flowing fabrics, bright colours, and a multitude of clashing patterns, textures and materials. Heavily inspired by the1960’s and 1970’s free spirited way of life, it is one of the most versatile styles of decoration.

The book opens with the author’s definition of bohemian style.

         ‘It is all about telling your story, and being as creative as you like. Every bohemian home is as unique as the person who creates it and the only things they all have in common are a lack of formality, an incredible sense of wellbeing and a big dose of unrestrained recklessness.’

         The book explains the different takes on bohemian design- whether you are a minimalist Scandinavian, glam, rustic, mid-century maximalist or colour lover- and how you can adapt the style to suit your tastes, needs and budget.

The room by room guide gives a key to mastering bohemian style- something that is often perceived as hard to get right simply because it lacks hard and fast design rules.

The book is dotted with wonderful images that will inspire the reader to create their own bohemian home.

Kate Young is a freelance interior stylist, blogger, social media influencer and writer. Her enormously successful Scandi-Boho blog, Kate Young Design, was nominated for Cosmopolitan Blog of the Year in 2015, and her  home has been featured in various publications, including EKBB Mag, and Abigail Ahern’s Interior Crush.

Blog, Exhibitions

SCRAPS an Exhibition of recycled textiles

Sorry you’ve just missed it, as it closed the 14th January. Palm Springs art museum held a fabulous exhibition SCRAPS: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. I am posting this now as I feel it is so important that we understand the world has finite resources, and those that recognise this and try to do something about it should be applauded and publicised. The exhibition featured the work of three women, from three continents, who put recycling at the heart of their design process. Luisa Cevese from Italy, Christina Kim from Los Angeles USA and Reiko Sudo from Japan all share a profound respect for scraps as repositories of raw materials, energy. labour, and creativity. Inspired by the long tradition of using handcraft to give new life to scraps and cast-offs, each takes an entirely different approach to contending with textile waste.

Christina Kim the founder of the Los Angeles-based fashion brand Dosa, has always drawn inspiration from traditional textile cultures around the world. Working with local artisans, she provides sustainable livelihoods by engaging in long-term collaborative relationships and paying fair wages. Her longstanding reverence for hand woven cloth led her fifteen years ago to jamdani

-the gossamer cotton saris worn in Bengal, India and Bangladesh became the fabric for her 2003 collection. Recognising the cultural history and human creativity embedded in the cloth, Kim collected the cutting-room scraps and had them pieced and appliqued into a wholecloth by skilled embroiderers in Gujarat, India. A second generation of clothing was cut from the re-engineered fabric in 2008, and the scraps gathered from this collection were made into tikdi, or small dots, appliqued on silk scarves until all the scraps were used. Equally important to Kim’s zero-waste approach is her intent ‘to help keep different traditions alive… investing the human hand with more or as much value as the material itself.”

         Reiko Sudo is Japanese she was born in 1953

She has been transforming how we think about textiles for the last three decades. She is the principal designer and managing director of Nuno, founded in 1984 and known for combining Japanese handicraft tradition with textile technologies to create extraordinary futhe silk cnctional textiles. Always conscious of the impact textile production has on the environment, Sudo has recently explored the creative potential of silk waste. Since 2007, her primary focus has been kibso – the outermost layer of  the silk cocoon that protects the delicate silk underneath.

Retrieved before the silk reeling process, kibiso is too coarse for industrial weaving, but working in collaboration with the city of Tsuruoka, Sudo has converted kibiso  into finer yarn that can be machine woven. During her kibiso experimentation, Sudo discovered another silk waste, ogarami choshi, a residue that sticks to the spinning shaft and has to be cut away. When the layers of the tightly curled material are peeled apart, they can be pressed together to create a translucent patchwork paper.

Sudo takes kibiso  fabric scraps and machine embroiders them onto a water soluble mesh that is then dissolved to give an open lace-like effect.

Luisa Cevese was born in Italy in 1955

In India there is very little wasted, used saris are cleaned, repaired, and sold on the second hand market. Luisa uses the waste  from the sari refurbishment – damaged borders that are cut when the saris are re-hemmed. One of her ongoing fabrics since 2009 is Muticoloured Taj textile  scraps of sari embedded in polyurethane.

book review, Uncategorized

CREATIVE COLLAGE by Clare Youngs

30 projects to transform your collages into wall art, personalized stationery, home accessories

9781782494898

In Creative Collage, author Clare Youngs reveals the secrets of collaging, one of her favourite crafts.

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As she says in her introduction

“Great artists who made collage part of their lifetime’s work have always inspired me. Although the techniques have been used since the invention of paper in China around 200 B.C.E., the word “collage” was first used in connection with art by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso at the beginning of the 20th century, when the technique became an important part of the Modern Art movement.”

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In this book Clare teaches you about the kinds of paper you can use, such as maps, tickets, photographs, typography and magazine pages, and how to add texture, use layering and make use of geometric designs. Some of Clare’s amazing collages are included for inspiration, and she explains how she chose the materials and composition for each one.

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“We can stand back in awe at the work of great artists, but in fact collage is something that anyone can enjoy. It is inexpensive, you don’t need a lot of equipment, it frees your mind, and allows you to release creativity within you that you didn’t even know was there. Great things happen when you let go a bit—what’s not to love?

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Clare then presents a collection of projects that offer unique ways of displaying and using collages even making 3-D collages, such as a découpaged chest of drawers and a family photo wooden block house. She explains how to use collage on fabrics and ceramics as well as a lamp shade and place mats.Screen Shot 2017-10-16 at 15.22.22

Along with helpful prompts to give you ideas for collages, this book provides all you need to get started with this personal, expressive craft.

Her other books include Folded Book Art, A Year in Crafts, Colour Yourself to Happiness, Book Art, Mobile Art, Wall Art, Make Your Own Woodland Creatures, Letter Art and Folk Art Needlecraft

Published by Cico BooksCREATIVE COLLAGE November 14th 2017 £12.99

I highly recommend this book and suggest you buy at least two copies, one to keep and one to give away as a present.

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