Blog, Press Show Picks

For 2020 Marimekko  has created a sustainable Gender Neutral collection

For this spring and summer the Finnish textile company Marimekko has created a new contemporary dimension to the print, called Marimekko Kioski, it is a curated collection of gender-neutral street-wear.

Marimekko_Kioski


Marimekko was founded by the late Armi Ratia in 1951. It is best known for a giant sized asymmetrical poppy design, Unikko- which means Poppy in Finnish. The design was created in in 1964 at a time, when the company’s collections featured mostly abstract prints. Designer Maija Isola wanted to create something interesting from this organic theme and designed an entire range of floral prints. Today, the iconic flower represents creativity.

       The collection encapsulates Marimekko‘s values of creative courage and the act of living, not pretending, by presenting its most iconic prints in a range of wearable staples.


 
In Marimekko’s creative community, doing things together has always been key to innovation and originality. The iconic patterns have been reborn  and reworked time and time again in thousands of imaginative color palettes. The Kioski collection was initially created to introduce Marimekko’s Unikko to a new, urban crowd and younger market.


 
For their Spring/Summer collection Marimekko collaborated with some of its favourite members of the vibrant Helsinki community of young doers and makers, and created a campaign celebrating creativity together with them.
 
’’For this new edition, we really wanted to celebrate the creative youth around us. The collection pieces are worn by some of the early adapters of what we’ve come to call Helsinki’s ‘Unikko streetwear phenomenon‘.’’ says Marimekko’s ready-to-wear head designer Satu Maaranen.

Marimekko_Kioski_

Although Armi Ratia died in 1979 her company is still embracing her ideas. She was a trailblazer who made Marimekko a way of life, an attitude, a phenomenon embracing the everyday and the extraordinary.

As part of its ambitious sustainability agenda, one of the key objectives of Marimekko is to continuously increase the share of sustainable cotton and more sustainable materials in its products and packaging. With this in mind that have started using the new  material Spinnova. It is a wood based fiber that contains no harmful chemicals. This method of production puts considerably less strain on the environment than, for example, viscose or cotton. The manufacture of Spinnova fiber consumes 99% less water than cotton production.

The company produces both fashion and home wares collections. I think they are fabulous I hope you do too.

Blog, Exhibitions

Out of The Blue

Fifty Years of Designers Guild

Exhibition at Fashion and Textile Museum 14 Feb -14 June 2020

Out of the Blue is the latest exhibition at London’s Fashion and Textile Museum. It celebrates the work of the influential design company Designers Guild, that was founded in 1970 by Tricia Guild OBE. Since it’s founding, the brand has evolved into a worldwide company whose products have changed the way we view colour, pattern and texture in our homes.

         Frustrated with the lack of truly contemporary fabrics and wallpapers for interiors, Tricia’s vision was to create a lifestyle, by showing people how to put the different elements of a room together, how colour, pattern, texture and form can combine to create a harmonious space.

From the outset, Guild knew she had to show people how to use her products and thus displays and photography of her new collections are vital tools for communicating the total effect. She has produced many books over the years and has emphasised the importance of plain and semi plain fabrics as being integral to the whole Guild look. Their importance were captured by Elizabeth Wilhide the co-writer of Tricia Guild’s new soft furnishings, which was issued six times between 1990 and 1997 published by Conran Octopus.

         The fashion and Textile museum is not an enormous venue and yet they have very successfully constructed room sets showing the different styles that Tricia Guild has created across the decades.

We are shown where Tricia’s inspiration comes from – her travels to India, Japan and Scandinavia have all resulted in collections of fabrics, wallpaper, furniture and accessories. Her inspiration may come from ancient Indian Textiles or Renaissance – style velvet or a Swedish Gustavian wall treatment, but the resulting interior collection are never drawn from one source alone. Instead each collection is an eclectic amalgam in which harmony exists between East and West, past and present.

‘I’m passionate about a home being comfortable as well as beautiful. Being surrounded by good design is one of life’s pleasures.” Tricia Guild.

In 1975 Tricia split from her husband and business partner, Robin. Tricia continued with the business, working from it’s original King’s Road Chelsea flagship store, and Designers Guild has flourished. The brand is represented in over 80 countries worldwide with a turnover of over £55 million. From the outset Designers Guild has always maintained its own interior design department, based in its stores at Chelsea and Marylebone.

Each project responds to the requirements of an individual client and the architectural setting, whether in London, Paris, Manhattan or Tuscany. The Guild look can be found in a mews cottage or a rood top pied-à-terre, or in period homes and country villas. Tricia’s own homes are often the first place for experimentation with new concepts. 

         Designers Guild is best known for florals and botanicals, but plain fabrics in a multitude of shades and textures as well as a range of geometrics and abstract designs are also vital to the mix.

 The exhibition highlights the techniques and processes vital for making the collections happen. In the quest for innovation, the company uses a variety of printing methods from hand block printing in the early days to rotary screen-printing and most recently digital printing.

         Throughout the fifty years she has been in business, Tricia has championed and collaborated with artists and designers from other disciplines including Howard Hodgkin, Kaffe Fassett and recently Ralph Lauren and Christian Lacroix.

         Never shown before, this exhibition showcases the story of Designers Guild in settings that capture the changing tastes in interiors over the last five decades.

The exhibition is curated by Dennis Nothdruft. Head of exhibitions at the Fashion and Textile Museum and Textile Historian Mary Schoeser, in collaboration with Designers Guild.

Fashion and Textile Museum 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF

T: 020 7407 8664

E: info@ftmlondon.org

Please note the Museum is open Tuesday – Saturday 11am-6pm ; Sunday 11am-5pm.

There is an excellent book to go with the exhibition published by ACC Art Books at a cost of £30

Blog, book review, Book Reviews

Bohemian Style at Home by Kate Young

published by Thames and Hudson at £14.95

Bohemian style is characterized by free-flowing fabrics, bright colours, and a multitude of clashing patterns, textures and materials. Heavily inspired by the1960’s and 1970’s free spirited way of life, it is one of the most versatile styles of decoration.

The book opens with the author’s definition of bohemian style.

         ‘It is all about telling your story, and being as creative as you like. Every bohemian home is as unique as the person who creates it and the only things they all have in common are a lack of formality, an incredible sense of wellbeing and a big dose of unrestrained recklessness.’

         The book explains the different takes on bohemian design- whether you are a minimalist Scandinavian, glam, rustic, mid-century maximalist or colour lover- and how you can adapt the style to suit your tastes, needs and budget.

The room by room guide gives a key to mastering bohemian style- something that is often perceived as hard to get right simply because it lacks hard and fast design rules.

The book is dotted with wonderful images that will inspire the reader to create their own bohemian home.

Kate Young is a freelance interior stylist, blogger, social media influencer and writer. Her enormously successful Scandi-Boho blog, Kate Young Design, was nominated for Cosmopolitan Blog of the Year in 2015, and her  home has been featured in various publications, including EKBB Mag, and Abigail Ahern’s Interior Crush.

Blog, book review, Book Reviews

Sashiko

20 projects using traditional Japanese stitching

Jill Clay

Published by GMC publications

Here at Creative Colour we are very taken with the whole concept of slow, and hand sewing  in particular, as a way of winding down after a hard days graft, so this book is perfect for us.

What is Sashiko? It is a traditional Japanese sewing method that uses evenly spaced running stitches to create eye catching geometric patterns. It has a humble background, originating as a form of darning – a way to strengthen weak areas of cothing. However its utilitarian beginnings have since been shed, and it is now a popular form of decorative embroidery.

This book explores this strikingly effective technique and demonstrates how to apply it to a range of useful and ornamental items for the home, and to accessories and gifts. Minimalist in style, Sashiko sits perfectly in modern interiors as well as traditional environments giving it broad appeal.

         Sashiko is pronounce Sash(i)ko, the I is almost silent. It means little stabs because it involves stabbing the needle in and out of the fabric, to make a number of small gathers on the needle.

When the needle is pulled through it creates a series of small stitches. It has also sometimes been called rice stitch as traditionally the yarn colour is off white and resembles a grain of sand.

         There are twenty projects in this book and several of them use traditional designs. Shippo Tsunaagi  known as Seven Treasures is a design used in Buddist Art. Bamboo is often used as a design and it signifies prosperity as well as purity and strength.

You need very little in the way of tools and the techniques are simple. The projects range from practical to beautiful. There are small projects that will take much less time than large ones with a density of stitches. So it is up to you to decide how long you have to create a project.

As the author, Jill Clay, says in this excellent book

“ Although there are some ‘rules’ to sashiko, I prefer to think of them as guidelines which is what my sashiko teacher taught me. Following the guidelines is important, but so is enjoying what you are doing. The simple message is don’t take it too seriously, relax and enjoy.”

Blog, book review, Book Reviews

Weave This

Over 30 fun projects for the modern weaver By Francesca Kletz and Brooke Dennis

Francesca Kletz and Brooke Dennis are the partnership who started and run The London Loom, a weaving studio in Hackney,  East London

         London Loom hosts both community workshops and smaller classes where adults and children work alongside each other inspiring creativity. As well as beginners weaving Francesca and Brooke also teach other crafts. This book is not your conventional weaving book, there are many styles and methods of weaving that are covered in the book.

Not all the projects are done on a loom, however the basic different steps are covered, as are tools and materials. These include interlocking, curves, soumak, rya knots and loop stitch.

         There are exciting and inventive ideas such as making a giant loom from a clothing rail or creating your own yarn from scraps of fabric. Tassel making is covered. One is shown how to weave a letter or even how to use a spade to create a wall hanging. Learn how to ice dye and to make a woven fringed back for a jacket.

If you want to create interior accessories there is a really cool shade, an upcycled chair with a new woven seat  a puja mat and some great geometric cushions and a rug. This book is full of exciting projects that takes what can be quite a worthy po faced activity and turns it into something that is fun.

If you want to start a new craft this is a bargain at £14.99.

Published by Hardie Grant Books

Blog, book review, Book Reviews, Uncategorized

On trend : Textile Folk Art

Textile Folk Art  By Anne Kelly published by Batsford

I was just about to review this book, when into my inbox popped the following, prescient quotes, from designer and licenserJehane, from ‘ making art work’

Folk Art  – Folklore ‘Art of the people’ celebrates traditions and rituals from across the world and the relationship between maker and object’

‘Art teaches us to see into things. Folk Art allows us to see outward from within things.’ Walter Benjamin.

This book is an inspirational exploration of folk art from around the world by textile artist http://www.annekellytextiles.com/Anne Kelly.

It includes samplers, quilts, tribal and nomadic cloth. Anne Kelly explores traditional motifs used throughout the world in textile folk art and shows how contemporary textile artists use them in their work today. She demonstrates how to incorporate treasured personal objects- such as garments, stitched samples, vintage lettering and motifs-into textile to create unique works of folk art.

The red horse by Mandy Pattullohttp://threadandthrift.blogspot.com/ mixed media textile, appliqué and embroidery on vintage quilt background

We are shown examples of collections from around the world – Scandinavia, USA, Australia, China and Mongolia. There are some step –by- step projects including collages, screen prints, folding books. We are shown creative collages on garments and even a stitched shed that was shown at the knitting and stitching show. The reader is given resource to some of the best textile artists, such as Nancy Nicholson, Mandy Pottulloh and Sue Stone and you can see their work on their web sites.

Romanian Commission by Anne Kelly, mixed-media textile

My verdict this is a lovely book that more than earns its place on a bookshelf, I will delve into time and again.

Blog, Exhibitions, Uncategorized

A sneak peak at Zandra Rhodes archived knit wear

Dame Zandra Rhodes selected ten, rarely seen, pieces of knitwear from her design archive as an exclusive for the Spring Knitting and Stitching show recently on at Olympia. Many of these pieces will be on show along with her beautiful textile designs and dresses in the exhibition 50 Years of Fabulous at the Fashion and Textile museum later this year. From 27th September to 26th January 2020

Black and Red ‘heart’ jumper Spring/Summer 1987 Venetian Palazzo collection
Black ‘Magic Head’ jumper Spring/Summer 1987 ‘Venetian Palazzo’ collection
Intarsia cashmere machine knit Clan Douglas for Zandra Rhodes

The acclaimed British designer Dame Zandra Rhodes DBE founded her eponymous fashion house in 1969 with a small collection. Her prints were Pop Art-infused commentaries on the world of Sixties Britain; the designer felt that there was inherent structure within the pattern that could work with and enhance the shape and construction of a dress. With this concept as a starting point and with her distinctive approach to cut and form, the house of Zandra Rhodes soon became one of the most recognisable labels in London.

In celebration of fifty years of the Zandra Rhodes’ label, the Fashion and Textile Museum presents Zandra Rhodes: Fifty Years of Fabulous. This retrospective will highlight 100 key looks, as well as 50 original textiles. This comprehensive exhibition will explore five decades of the distinguished career of a British design legend.

Grey jumper with pearl shoulder detail Autumn/Winter 1980 ‘Elizabethan’ collection
Rib machine knit

Black and Gold Lurex Jacket Autumn/winter 1987 ‘Wish Upon a Star’ collection Double Bed jacquard machine knit
‘Magic Head’ dress Spring/Summer 1989 ‘Venetian Palazzo’ collection
Intarsia cashmere machine knit Clan Douglas for Zandra Rhodes
Blue and Gold Lurex coat
Autun/Winter 1987
‘Wish Upon a Star’ collection
Double bed Jacquard machine knit